Z – ‘ZERO INVENTION’


Z

Zero is synonym for the word none, meaning nothing, but zero plays a very important factor in our daily life and has great importance in mathematics and other subjects. The origin or invention of zero seems a bit mysterious as there are many claims and stories behind its first existence or invention and to properly unwind this sotry you need to go all the way back  to the 3rd century BC. Zero may have no value when you see it as a single character, but when it is added to other characters, it can totally change the meaning and worth.

Abu Abdullah Mohammad Ibn Musa al Khwarizmi ,  mathematician, astronomer, geographer and influential in the formation of algebra and who was borned in 780 (died in 850 CE) had something meangingful to share regardind the concept of zero. Al Khwarizmi explained the use of zero. He introduced the Indian system of numerals, commonly known as the Arabic numeral system,  which through his work was introduced first to the Arabs through translations and later introduced to the west. Al Khwarizmi one book which was later translated in early twelth century into Latin was basically focusing on arithematics and was called “Kitab al Jam’a wal – Tafreeq bil Hisaab al Hindi” (“The Book of Addition and Subtraction According to the Hindu Calculation”).

The people of Europe in those very early days were literally in the Dark Ages in many ways. They only came to know about the concept of zero when they performed trade with the Arab  in 8th Century. The Arabs were, as we mentioned above, guided and trained by Al Khwarizmi.  Indian mathematician and astronomer, Aryabhata, around 9th century C.E is considered to be the founder of Zero. There is no doubt from Al Khwarizmi work and other Arabs scholars that this area was quite rich in knowledge. Inf act “Sindh” which is a province of Pakistan, was considered “Bab-Ul-Islam” and people from Arab use to come to this region to gain knowledge. Pakistan and India were one country before 1947. Also some historian believe that the word “Shunya” (Which is an Indian word for zero) was translated in Arabic as “Sifr” meaning nothing. The arabic word “Sifr” was later translated to “Zephyr” in Latin and then it was evolved to the recent word “Zero”.

If I were a Book


If I were a book, you could flip through my pages to underline the favorite things about me,

fold my page corners or bookmark them and tell your friends about how wonderful I am.

You would save me in a bookshelf next to your bed where you come to escape reality

and dream of things that make you happy.

You would read me again and again as if I were the only book you’ve got

and you would take me everywhere with you because I would make you

happy with the way I choose words for you and how sweetly you

would let them flow through my papers.

“This post is a part of the prompt of the week, IF I WERE A BOOK, by The BlogChatter online community of bloggers in Twitter which meet every Wednesday at 8.30 PM IST discussing various blogging topics on twitter.”

You’ve Got the Wrong Girl


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About the author: Sreemoyee Piu Kundu has been a lifestyle editor and PR head, and is now a fulltime novelist based in Delhi. She is the author of two novels, Faraway Music and the bestselling Sita’s Curse, and is planning her fourth novel a political tragedy titled Rahula. Her first non-fiction title, Status Single, will be published in 2016.

Blurb: On a sultry night, on a deserted lawn overlooking a moonlit Taj Mahal, two strangers make passionate love and promise never to meet again… But promises are meant to be broken, right? This is the story of Dushyant Singh Rathore – the 30-something bestselling author of Kinda Clichéd, a blockbuster romance novel based on his one night of bliss with a girl whose name he does not know. Under pressure to produce a money-spinning sequel – from his obsessive fans, his hit-seeking publisher, his pushy agent and a sceptical journalist ready to expose the true story angle as a marketing gimmick – he sets off, three years on, to find the elusive girl whom he had promised never to seek out. When his quest, many twists and turns later, leads him to the unlikeliest of places and the strangest of characters, Dushyant discovers there’s a little more to his search than he had anticipated. Will Dushyant discover his mystery woman? What if the wrong girl was really always the right one for him? Will he get a second chance? Delightful, unconventional, heart-warming, You’ve Got the Wrong Girl is about one man’s journey to discover his heart and the supremely unpredictable nature of love.

Review:  You’ve Got the Wrong Girl published by Hachette and authored Sreemoyee Piu Kundu is a lad-lit. What is lad-lit? Lad-lit is defined as “fiction about young men about their personal and emotional lives.” This, by common understanding, would be expected to be created by a man who would be able to enter the head of a young man much better than a woman. But Sreemoyee has turned the tables of this genre by deciding to pen a novel with a male as the protagonist and giving him the first person voice in the narrative. It is a big challenge to get into a man’s head, trying to understand the way he thinks about certain things on love, life, relationships and so on. Sreemoyee has reversed the mythological love story of Dushyanta and Shakuntala by setting Dushyanta in search of this lady he fell in love with at first sight and had no peace till he finally found the girl had spent a night of love and passion with against the blurred backdrop of the Taj Mahal in silhouette. “You’ve Got the Wrong Girl is a contemporary relocation and reinterpretation of this mythological story placed in post-modern India with its five-star hotels and shopping malls and branded clothes and so on. Iit is a multi city, roller-coaster ride, sometimes soulful, sometimes bittersweet, sometimes fun, sometimes family drama-oriented tumultuous that involves a whole bunch of motley, everyday characters drawn from the people we see around us. And since it’s based on inspiration by Shakuntala as told from the male perspective – the author has designed it as a search Dushyanta embarks on and not the other way round. How he wins her back is the backbone of the story Dushyant is a best-selling, new-age romance writer and his novel which becomes an overnight bestseller and is made into a film by a noted filmmaker,” sums up the book. Sreemoyee has tried to mix up the stereotype formula of the girl pining away for the boy she fell in love with but could not marry because he is poor and the parents put their foot down. “Why must it always be the girl burdened with the emotional burden of this lost-and-found drama called love? I liked that she wanted to shake this up every which way and the result is You’ve Got the Wrong Girl who is probably the right girl for Dushyant”.

Rukhsat


 

RUKHSAT THE DEPARTURE 
BY 
SUJIT BANERJEE
Blurb 
Where a story stops, another one begins. The thing with them is, they never walk alone. They always walk with a group of friends. Each reaches its own climax. Then with a final gasp of mortality and despair, fade away. No, they never die, they multiply. To the extent that the original gets lost and new ones are born. Over and over again. Yes, they get lost. No, they never die. They live on, permanently etched in the book of time. And from there, we borrow them and bring them alive. Again. And again. Here are twenty six of them, some standing alone and some chatting up with their long lost friends. When they depart, they leave a lingering fragrance of nostalgia and curiosity. What happened then? Twenty-six alphabets, twenty-six names, and twenty-six short stories. Each exploring one unique emotion, taking you into the dark recess of the mind. Some frothy and most of them dark. Most standing alone and some facing a mirror, where the same story comes alive in two different ways, through two different protagonist . Meet myriad characters – from the single-minded prostitute to the man on the railways station bereft of any memory; a woman desperate for a biological child to a dead man’s trial. Meet a jealous lover with a twisted brain and a gay man’s memory of a one-night encounter. Meet twenty-six such characters arrested and sentenced for life inside the pages of a book. Each one leaving an indelible mark on your soul.
Buy @
amazon.in | amazon.com
ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

Born to Bengali parents in Lucknow, I grew up in Patna where I finished my post-graduation in Psychology and ended up becoming a tour operator instead of a Psychologist! Which was good since a Bengali born in UP and reared in Bihar does not make a great Psychologist! Am I now glad to be in tourism? It has taken me all over the world including places you would have never heard of. Eh? How about Tlacotalpan? It’s in Mexico. Destiny had other plans as well so I became a reluctant healer. A crazy Shaman in Mexico set the ball rolling and it has rolled all the way to Delhi. Today I both heal as well as read Tarot cards. My wife thinks I am mad. My friends think I am weird. I guess I am book. My first story was published in a magazine when I was seventeen. The Editor made such a hash of it that I stopped sending out my stories but I continued writing. Then I broke my heart and started writing poems; first in Hindi and then in English. All personal collection. They still remain personal. I do shudder when I read some of them! Then the short stories came back and written over two years – now is a collection.

Review:  Rukhsat the Departure by Sujit Banerjee has 26 short stories with 26 characters that take the readers into the strange condition where narration comes in two ways, through 2 protagonists with stories woven on mysteries. It is an exceptional collection of stories. From the forms of revenge, love and hate to criminal events, ruthless experiments with innumerable characters of a prostitute to the guy on the railway station from a lady anxious to a departed man’s trial, from a lover with a distorted brain to a gay man’s memories of a one-night encounter. The central themes of the stories are tragic and negative, with misfortune against the characters that contains genres and atmospheres completely different but equally enjoyable to read. With well-written stories the book has a sequence of emotions, unexpected to the reader with issues, dramatic and upsetting described with irony with very forceful stories, structured to entice the reader to read them with vitality. The reading is smooth and what transpired from the novel is the meaning that nobody is as it seems, each of us hides a part of our character, of being invisible to most people, which languishes dusk, and that comes to light only when and if it is exposed.

Rukhsat: The Departure by Sujit Banerjee


 

RUKHSAT THE DEPARTURE 
BY 
SUJIT BANERJEE
Blurb 
Where a story stops, another one begins. The thing with them is, they never walk alone. They always walk with a group of friends. Each reaches its own climax. Then with a final gasp of mortality and despair, fade away. No, they never die, they multiply. To the extent that the original gets lost and new ones are born. Over and over again. Yes, they get lost. No, they never die. They live on, permanently etched in the book of time. And from there, we borrow them and bring them alive. Again. And again. Here are twenty six of them, some standing alone and some chatting up with their long lost friends. When they depart, they leave a lingering fragrance of nostalgia and curiosity. What happened then?
Twenty-six alphabets, twenty-six names, and twenty-six short stories. Each exploring one unique emotion, taking you into the dark recess of the mind. Some frothy and most of them dark. Most standing alone and some facing a mirror, where the same story comes alive in two different ways, through two different protagonist . Meet myriad characters – from the single-minded prostitute to the man on the railways station bereft of any memory; a woman desperate for a biological child to a dead man’s trial. Meet a jealous lover with a twisted brain and a gay man’s memory of a one-night encounter. Meet twenty-six such characters arrested and sentenced for life inside the pages of a book. Each one leaving an indelible mark on your soul.
Buy @
amazon.in | amazon.com

Meet the Cast 

Abhimanyu – In the Beginning
 

I felt the poison of anger raging around me, inside me, pulsating like an entity; anger at the one who betrayed and the one who took advantage of this betrayal. The anger of not being able to stop both. Then the flash of knife and the flowing blood, shimmering in the flames of the torches inside the chamber. Screams followed by hushed voices; bodies being dragged down a flight of stairs. The sound of digging and burying. Later, ruins all around as empires fell and one intrigue chased another through time while swords sliced and arrows whiz past, seeking hearts. Who was I and what was all this about? Why were most of the images that flitted through my head always dark and tinged with red? Rarely, very rarely were they warm and loving. So rarely were they, ever like the sun shining on a cold and shivering memory.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR 

 

Born to Bengali parents in Lucknow, I grew up in Patna where I finished my post-graduation in Psychology and ended up becoming a tour operator instead of a Psychologist! Which was  good since a Bengali born in UP and reared in Bihar does not make a great Psychologist! Am I now glad to be in tourism? It has taken me all over the world including places you would have never heard of. Eh? How about Tlacotalpan? It’s in Mexico. Destiny had other plans as well so I became a reluctant healer. A crazy Shaman in Mexico set the ball rolling and it has rolled all the way to Delhi. Today I both heal as well as read Tarot cards. My wife thinks I am mad. My friends think I am weird. I guess I am both.
My first story was published in a magazine when I was seventeen. The Editor made such a hash of it that I stopped sending out my stories but I continued writing. Then I broke my heart and started writing poems; first in Hindi and then in English. All personal collection. They still remain personal. I do shudder when I read some of them! Then the short stories came back and written over two years – now is a collection.
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Y – ‘YOU AND ME’


Y

The sentences are elaborate
As the talks tends to fall upon, time flies
Into edgy quiet

It populates and punctuates the exchange
About the lengthy parted and rarely seen
And there is graceless effort about us

Like a bird’s broken wing
Powerless to fly
Continually tries to fails
To get on carried by the wind over again

But there has been a growth
Of a frozen peace amid us
Which fills the empty space
Among words and alter them
To gauche stops

A tautness fall about us
In the vein of a snake that gradually twists and contracts
By ever increasing force
Around its prey wounding off faction
Until neither gasp nor blow can getaway

X- ‘X IN SEX: HOW THE X CHROMOSOME CONTROLS OUR LIVES’


X

 

A tiny scrap of genetic information determines our sex; it also consigns many of us to a life of disease, directs or disrupts the everyday working of our bodies, and forces women to live as genetic chimeras. The culprit – so necessary and yet the source of such upheaval – is the X chromosome, and this is its story. An enlightening and entertaining tour of the cultural and natural history of this intriguing member of the genome, The X in Sex traces the journey toward our current understanding of the nature of X. From its chance discovery in the 19th century to the promise and implications of ongoing research, David Bainbridge show how the X evolved and where it and its counterpart Y are going, how it helps assign developing human babies their sex – and maybe even their sexuality – and how it affects our lives in infinitely complex and subtle ways. X offers cures for disease, challenges our cultural, ethical and scientific assumptions about maleness and femaleness, and has even reshaped our views of human evolution and human nature. First off, The X in Sex is a very accessible non-fiction book about the genetics that make us who we are sexually. It was interesting to the non-scientist and a very quick read. But I do have to say that I didn’t learn nearly enough new material to make me feel like it had been absolutely worth my time. David Bainbridge acts like he’s bestowing never-before-mentioned news when he talks about X and Y chromosomes and sex-linked diseases. As I mentioned, this is a very accessible book for the non- scientist. I think it would be an excellent book for someone who has very little or no knowledge whatsoever of chromosomes, genes, DNA, etc, and how they work. Bainbridge manages to talk about fairly complex topics in language the layman can understand and infuses his writing with humor. His humor is much  better when it is unconscious (or at least gives a better impression of being so). The more blatant, “wink-wink, nudge-nudge” sexual references and the anecdotes which are prefaced with “Let me tell you this funny little anecdote” aren’t nearly as funny as he would seem to think. The one exception is his anecdote about (quite literally) the Duke of Kent’s testicles. Despite the racy title and cover, this book really is a history of the X Chromosome. It mostly covers the X Chromosome in humans, but contrasts it with a lot of other species. The book also gives cogent descriptions of several chromosome abnormalities. It’s  also a short and easy read — always a plus!

W – “WHERE THERE IS A WILL, THERE IS A WAY”


W

Life is an art

A mountain of troubles

In your trouble don’t cry

You should only try and try

Struggle hard

And conquer the sky

With your skill

And power of will

Be active,

Ever green and optimistic

Hope for the sky

You will learn to fly

To dream is your

Right to struggle is your duty

Will power is your need

To achieve the sky and to fly

Will is a great force both for good and evil. It makes impossible things possible. The story of man’s progress from chaos to order, from barbarism to civilization, is nothing but a story of his will power pitted against all the hostile forces of nature. This will power can be achieved by ably one of us by continuous process of concentration on noble objectives. Once acquired, it will enable us to have our way in all things. We should live every moment and live life to the full. We should count out the negatives and challenge ourselves to design the best life. Never forget; where there is a will, there is a way.

V- ‘VALENTINE’S DAY’


V

FOR 365 days of the every year I am single and I am free to do whatever I want, when I want. Being tied to a partner meant I would never have been able to do so many things on my own. To me, being single means no smooshing someone else into my schedule, no judgement for the clothes I wear or the movies I like to watch and best of all a bed all to myself. Then Valentine’s Day happens. The balloons, the chocolate, the stupidly cards – they are all screaming that you need a partner. The TV shows and movies about the mopey single girls in a corner while everyone else is loved up. The slightly nauseating news stories about some random person’s over the top expression of love. The entire world is telling you, you need to be loved up and if you aren’t there is something wrong with you. I’m happy being single, no one else gets to be the judge of that.

I have never been in a relationship, I don’t understand why there is a day dedicated to love. There is so much hype about the day dedicated to showering your loved one with gifts. I truly believe we should share the love every day. It is about the memories and experiences we share in life that leave the biggest imprint on our hearts. The special experiences doing something you love together show the true meaning of love. These are the moments you cherish forever. I would love the experiences like getting home from work to the smell of my favourite meal being cooked by candlelight with a glass of wine or whiskey, or enjoying an adventurous experience we both love like ( if at all I get hitched). I believe when you meet your best friend, who becomes your love, life is more about the joys you experience together in life rather than the watch or tie you gift him or the bag he gifts you.

U -‘ULYSSES’


U

It little profits that an idle king,
By this still hearth, among these barren crags,
Match’d with an aged wife, I mete and dole
Unequal laws unto a savage race,
That hoard, and sleep, and feed, and know not me.
I cannot rest from travel: I will drink
Life to the lees: All times I have enjoy’d
Greatly, have suffer’d greatly, both with those
That loved me, and alone, on shore, and when
Thro’ scudding drifts the rainy Hyades
Vext the dim sea: I am become a name;
For always roaming with a hungry heart
Much have I seen and known; cities of men
And manners, climates, councils, governments,
Myself not least, but honour’d of them all;
And drunk delight of battle with my peers,
Far on the ringing plains of windy Troy.
I am a part of all that I have met;
Yet all experience is an arch wherethro’
Gleams that untravell’d world whose margin fades
For ever and forever when I move.
How dull it is to pause, to make an end,
To rust unburnish’d, not to shine in use!
As tho’ to breathe were life! Life piled on life
Were all too little, and of one to me
Little remains: but every hour is saved
From that eternal silence, something more,
A bringer of new things; and vile it were
For some three suns to store and hoard myself,
And this gray spirit yearning in desire
To follow knowledge like a sinking star,
Beyond the utmost bound of human thought.

 

         This is my son, mine own Telemachus,
To whom I leave the sceptre and the isle,—
Well-loved of me, discerning to fulfil
This labour, by slow prudence to make mild
A rugged people, and thro’ soft degrees
Subdue them to the useful and the good.
Most blameless is he, centred in the sphere
Of common duties, decent not to fail
In offices of tenderness, and pay
Meet adoration to my household gods,
When I am gone. He works his work, I mine.

 

There lies the port; the vessel puffs her sail:
There gloom the dark, broad seas. My mariners,
Souls that have toil’d, and wrought, and thought with me—
That ever with a frolic welcome took
The thunder and the sunshine, and opposed
Free hearts, free foreheads—you and I are old;
Old age hath yet his honour and his toil;
Death closes all: but something ere the end,
Some work of noble note, may yet be done,
Not unbecoming men that strove with Gods.
The lights begin to twinkle from the rocks:
The long day wanes: the slow moon climbs: the deep
Moans round with many voices. Come, my friends,
‘T is not too late to seek a newer world.
Push off, and sitting well in order smite
The sounding furrows; for my purpose holds
To sail beyond the sunset, and the baths
Of all the western stars, until I die.
It may be that the gulfs will wash us down:
It may be we shall touch the Happy Isles,
And see the great Achilles, whom we knew.
Tho’ much is taken, much abides; and tho’
We are not now that strength which in old days
Moved earth and heaven, that which we are, we are;
One equal temper of heroic hearts,
Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will
To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

This poem is written as a dramatic monologue: the entire poem is spoken by a single character, whose identity is revealed by his own words. The lines are in blank verse, or unrhymed iambic pentameter, which serves to impart a fluid and natural quality to Ulysses’s speech. Many of the lines are enjambed, which means that a thought does not end with the line-break; the sentences often end in the middle, rather than the end, of the lines. The use of enjambment is appropriate in a poem about pushing forward “beyond the utmost bound of human thought. Tennyson reworks the figure of Ulysses by drawing on the ancient hero of Homer’s Odyssey and the medieval hero of Dante’s Inferno. Homer’s Ulysses, as described in Scroll XI of the Odyssey, learns from a prophecy that he will take a final sea voyage after killing the suitors of his wife Penelope. The details of this sea voyage are described by Dante in Canto XXVI of the Inferno: Ulysses finds himself restless in Ithaca and driven by “the longing I had to gain experience of the world.” Dante’s Ulysses is a tragic figure who dies while sailing too far in an insatiable thirst for knowledge. Tennyson combines these two accounts by having Ulysses make his speech shortly after returning to Ithaca and resuming his administrative responsibilities, and shortly before embarking on his final voyage. However, this poem also concerns the poet’s own personal journey, for it was composed in the first few weeks after Tennyson learned of the death of his dear college friend Arthur Henry Hallam in 1833. Like In Memoriam, then, this poem is also an elegy for a deeply cherished friend. Ulysses, who symbolizes the grieving poet, proclaims his resolution to push onward in spite of the awareness that “death closes all”. As Tennyson himself stated, the poem expresses his own “need of going forward and braving the struggle of life” after the loss of his beloved Hallam.

The poem’s final line, “to strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield,” came to serve as a motto for the poet’s Victorian contemporaries: the poem’s hero longs to flee the tedium of daily life “among these barren crags” and to enter a mythical dimension “beyond the sunset, and the baths of all the western stars” as such, he was a model of individual self-assertion and the Romantic rebellion against bourgeois conformity. Thus for Tennyson’s immediate audience, the figure of Ulysses held not only mythological meaning, but stood as an important contemporary cultural icon as well.

“Ulysses,” like many of Tennyson’s other poems, deals with the desire to reach beyond the limits of one’s field of vision and the mundane details of everyday life. Ulysses is the antithesis of the mariners in “The Lotos-Eaters,” who proclaim “we will no longer roam” and desire only to relax amidst the Lotos fields. In contrast, Ulysses “cannot rest from travel” and longs to roam the globe. Like the Lady of Shallot, who longs for the worldly experiences she has been denied, Ulysses hungers to explore the untraveled world.

As in all dramatic monologues, here the character of the speaker emerges almost unintentionally from his own words. Ulysses’ incompetence as a ruler is evidenced by his preference for potential quests rather than his present responsibilities. He devotes a full 26 lines to his own egotistical proclamation of his zeal for the wandering life, and another 26 lines to the exhortation of his mariners to roam the seas with him. However, he offers only 11 lines of lukewarm praise to his son concerning the governance of the kingdom in his absence, and a mere two words about his “aged wife” Penelope. Thus, the speaker’s own words betray his abdication of responsibility and his specificity of purpose.

T – “TECHNO SLAVES”


T

I see people everywhere but not interacting with each other but heads down focused on their phones. Then, I turn to Twitter and post my snarky comment about how sad it is. With everyone doing the same, I have done it too.  Our phones are constantly buzzing. The notification icon has saturated our lives – it’s on our laptops, on our phones – begging us to pay attention; begging us to drop everything and find out what it could possibly be. Unintentionally, technology has become our closest friend, the person we will do anything for, drop anything for, even break away from an important conversation to be with.

Without technology and our mobile phones in particular, we feel naked, stripped and alone. Vacations now include a laptop. What’s a trip without photos that we immediately upload to Facebook and Instagram? It’s like it didn’t happen, at least if we don’t share them in real-time. Are we really that lonely, sad and desperate for attention?

I have seen families who can’t put down their phones at dinner. Ads mock the breakup text, but we all know someone who has been on the receiving end. Work is only an email away, making time off and vacations a distant reality. Phones buzz; emails alert; but we’re never satisfied with what we get. We’re all techno slaves. One machine can do the work of fifty ordinary Man. No machine can do the work of extra ordinary Man.

Technology is a surprising thing. It  brings  you  great  gifts  with  one  hand  and  stabs  you  in  the  back  with  the  other .  You  don’t  have  to  go  around  making  trouble  for  yourself  –  technology  does  it  for  you .

Right  from  the  plastic  toy  to  plastic  surgery , and  from  a  common  pin  to  rocket , we  have  been  taking  the  help  of  technology . Youngsters  think  why  to  play  football , or rugby  outside , when  there’s  a  play station  at  home . What’s the need to write?  Let us text on the mobile/ computer / laptop. Why to read books? There are audio books available on internet. Doctors  can’t  tell  what  is  wrong  with  you without  X – rays , CT  scan , etc.

I’m  compelled  to  fear  that  technology   will  be  used  to  promote  the  power  of  dominant  group  rather  than  to  make  them  happy .  Men  has  a  moral  sense  which  animals  don’t  have but  technology   makes  men  indifferent  to  all  the  higher  things  of  life . Technological  progress  has  merely  provided  us  with  more  efficient  means  for  going  backwards  . Humanity  is  acquiring  all  the  right  technology  for  all  wrong  reasons .   I  like  my  new  smart phone , my  laptop  just  works smoothly and my  calculator  is  ideal but I miss the god given intelligence being put to work.

S- ‘SELF RELIANCE’


S

You must go on in your life, without relying on others, self-dependent and self-confident. In other words, self-help should be the guiding principle of your life, your idea and your aspirations. But circumstanced as you are or a person in general, absolute self-reliance is impossible. You live in a society where the rule is mutual help. You give and receive. This is perfectly right. Wrong comes in only when you take without giving anything in return, when rights are enjoyed or plunder but not exchange. But though absolute self-dependence is impossible, yet there is ample room for self-reliance in your life.

In actual practise we depend too much on others, we rely too much on other’s help, sympathy, fellow feeling and goodness. But this habit in actual term is harmful. It takes away all your energy and initiative. It fills you with helplessness. Just as a child, who is not allowed to walk for fear of falling becomes lame in the long run, so we turn morally lame and deformed if we never try to practise self help in life.

By expecting too much from others, you get to invite ridicule, pity, scorn and disgust. You are looked upon as hangers and parasites. You become dead in terms of respect and honor. Your own importance in the midst of people, full of energy makes you miserable. Nothing is more pitiable than to live in jealousy.

Different is however the picture of yourself as a self-reliant. You are brave and determined. You trust no outside help; expect no windfall, struggles with difficulties, gathering strength and experiences at every stage. You may succeed or fail but you are always an object of awe, respect and admiration.

Being self-reliant is rewarded by the earth and heaven alike. You get the homage of people around you. In a world, where success is so rare, you succeed, where many are called but a few chose, you receive the invitation.

Nothing is nobler and surer than self-help. Gifts of fortune are uncertain. Even when you get them, you cannot always enjoy them in peace. There is always a feeling that you have got more or less than you deserve. There is always an anxiety that these gifts, being not earned, may go away suddenly as they came in your life.

Practise begets felicity. If you make up your mind not to be depended upon others, but to do all your works yourself as far as possible, if you are determined to stand on your legs and not lean upon others, you are full of energy. You shall soon get enough self-confidence, a faith and will power which will move even mountains.

FINDING JULIET BY TOFFEE


RELEASE BLITZ- FINDING JULIET BY TOFFEE

Title: FINDING JULIET
 
Release Day: APRIL 21, 2016
 
Published by: JUGGERNAUT BOOKS
Genre: ROMANCE
 
BlurbAn incredibly nice guy turns into an irresistible flirt and learns the fine art of seducing women. A hilarious and heartwarming novel with some surprising nuggets of wisdom.
 
Cover: 
 
Links to the book will be available after the release of the Juggernaut app! 
ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 
 
Toffee is just another Indian youngster who became an Engineer first and then discovered his true calling. He was a typical Sharma ji ka Ladka, until Engineering happened and changed his life completely. After surviving college, he joined a reputed MNC as a Software Analyst, but a dramatic turn of events made him an author. Toffee is passionate about writing, so much so that he writes code by the day and books by the night and does everything else in life in between. A huge Rajkumar Hirani fan, he loves writing stuff that is both entertaining and insightful. And through his books, he wants to narrate stories that touch people’s hearts and change a part of their life, forever.
 
Toffee’s first book titled ‘An Idiot, Placements and IntervYOU’ was published by the Times Group Books and it went on sell around 5000 copies. ‘Finding Juliet’ is his second book and Juggernaut Books is publishing it exclusively on their mobile app.
 
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R- “ROME WAS NOT BUILT IN A DAY”


R

There are things in the world which took a considerably long time to mature. It is the nature of a task that determines the length of time it would take to be accomplished. Some people are in the habit of getting impatient, when a task takes a little too long to complete. This dialect “Rome was not built in a day” is used to inform the impatient people that great things are not done or accomplished overnight.

Rome, was the capital of the Roman Empire and the citadel of the Roman Catholic Church. Roman Emperor Augustas was considered to be the real builder of Rome. Rome consisted of only a few hamlets when Augustus came to the throne. It took about 40 years for him to transform the face of Rome into a metropolis, adorned with beautiful mansions, theatres, temples, public baths and many other public buildings.

Let me talk about the great wonders of the world. We often admire their greatness but are apt to forget the tremendous amount of money and material, human labour and time that have gone into their making. The Taj Mahal is a monumental architecture. It took decades for its building. ShahJahan got this finest piece of architecture constructed with great patience and with huge expenditure over a long span of time. It is because of these factors that the Taj occupies a place of pride in India. The huge pyramids of Giza took several generations of Pharaohs to attain their overpowering magnitude and staggering height. The Great Wall of China is another case in point. These random examples are enough to prove the truth of the saying.

We are all aware of the persistence that enabled Tenzing reach a top of Mount Everest. Milton took a quarter-century of years to complete his great epic Paradise Lost. Tulsidas took several years of constant labour in compiling Ramacharitamanas.

Success in life too that one needs steady and continuous work. Civilizations did not develop in a country or two. Nor science or technology is the result of the efforts of one individual or a single experiment. It is because hundreds of people zealously worked for generations together that we now enjoy easy and comfortable life. Most of those people who had so toiled are not known to the history, they are the people, who never cared for fame, who were not deterred by failures, whose only aim was to go ahead steadfastly in their work.

When we turn to the nature and watch a bird making its nest, we will certainly be amazed for its patience and perseverance. A clumsy bird like the crow, brings dry sticks and twigs from a tree in its beak, puts them at the joint of two branches, arranges and rearranges them until it finally takes the shape it wants! It does not give up its job – the sticks may fall now and then and the wind may blow off its partly built nest. Still it persists.

People in our country are impatient of the slow pace if our progress to prosperity. They often contrast our poverty with the affluence of the USA without bothering their heads with the facts that it took even the Western capital coupled with technical skill and the virgin soil of America about a hundred and fifty years to make the USA the rich and prosperous country that we admire. We cannot eradicate the poverty of centuries within a few decades. It will take time for Rome was not built in a day. Nothing can be achieved in a single day. There is nothing called instant success. As a result one should be patient throughout his journey to reach his goal.